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"GHOST GHOSTS"

the blue man ghost

Are strange mists are dark shadows in photos of your home a sign that real ghosts are haunting you?

The simple answer might just surprise you!

by Jerome Dunne

Why is it important to believe in ghosts?

I often have pondered this question as I search the darkness of haunted homes and decaying forgotten cemeteries through out the United States.

Am I looking for them for my personal reasons or to prove something to the world.

Many conjecture that proving to the world that real ghosts exist is as in depth as proving that you have found the Holy Grail. I often have wondered to myself if it is to test our fate or to bring us closer to a belief in God?

A proof of real ghosts would of course lead us to the inevitable that if ghosts are actually real then so are angels, devil's and all that we would accept as religious dogma and spiritual paranormal occurrences would be of course labeled as normal.

Some researchers, such as Professor Michael Persinger (Laurentian University, Canada), have speculated that changes in geomagnetic fields (created, e.g., by tectonic stresses in the Earth's crust or solar activity) could stimulate the brain's temporal lobes and produce many of the experiences associated with hauntings. This theory has been tested in various ways. Some scientists have examined the relationship between the time of onset of unusual phenomena in allegedly haunted locations and any sudden increases in global geomagnetic activity. Others have investigated whether the location of alleged hauntings is associated with certain types of magnetic activity. Finally, a third strand of work has involved laboratory studies in which stimulation of the temporal lobe with transcerebral magnetic fields has elicited subjective experiences that strongly parallel phenomena associated with hauntings. All of this work is controversial; it has attracted a large amount of debate and disagreement.[63] Sound is thought to be another cause of supposed sightings. Frequencies lower than 20 hertz are called infrasound and are normally inaudible, but scientists Richard Lord and Richard Wiseman have concluded that infrasound can cause humans to experience bizarre feelings in a room, such as anxiety, extreme sorrow, a feeling of being watched, or even the chills.[64] Carbon monoxide poisoning, which can cause changes in perception of the visual and auditory systems,[65] was recognized as a possible explanation for haunted houses as early as 1921.

So what is a real ghost?

ghost   /goʊst/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [gohst] Show IPA –noun 1. the soul of a dead person, a disembodied spirit imagined, usually as a vague, shadowy or evanescent form, as wandering among or haunting living persons.

2. a mere shadow or semblance; a trace: He's a ghost of his former self.

3. a remote possibility: He hasn't a ghost of a chance.

4. (sometimes initial capital letter) a spiritual being.

5. the principle of life; soul; spirit.

6. Informal. ghost writer.

7. a secondary image, esp. one appearing on a television screen as a white shadow, caused by poor or double reception or by a defect in the receiver.

8. Also called ghost image. Photography. a faint secondary or out-of-focus image in a photographic print or negative resulting from reflections within the camera lens.

9. an oral word game in which each player in rotation adds a letter to those supplied by preceding players, the object being to avoid ending a word.

10. Optics. a series of false spectral lines produced by a diffraction grating with unevenly spaced lines.

11. Metalworking. a streak appearing on a freshly machined piece of steel containing impurities.

12. a red blood cell having no hemoglobin.

13. a fictitious employee, business, etc., fabricated esp. for the purpose of manipulating funds or avoiding taxes: Investigation showed a payroll full of ghosts. –verb (used with object)

14. to ghostwrite (a book, speech, etc.).

15. to haunt.

16. Engraving. to lighten the background of (a photograph) before engraving. –verb (used without object)

17. to ghostwrite.

18. to go about or move like a ghost.

19. (of a sailing vessel) to move when there is no perceptible wind.

20. to pay people for work not performed, esp. as a way of manipulating funds. –adjective

21. fabricated for purposes of deception or fraud: We were making contributions to a ghost company. —Idiom

22. give up the ghost, a. to die. b. to cease to function or exist. Origin: bef. 900; ME goost (n.), OE gāst; c. G Geist spirit Related forms: ghostiy, adverb ghostlike, adjective Synonyms:

1. apparition, phantom, phantasm, wraith, revenant; shade, spook. Ghost, specter, spirit all refer to the disembodied soul of a person. A ghost is the soul or spirit of a deceased person, which appears or otherwise makes its presence known to the living: the ghost of a drowned child. A specter is a ghost or apparition of more or less weird, unearthly, or terrifying aspect: a frightening specter. Spirit is often interchangeable with ghost but may mean a supernatural being, usually with an indication of good or malign intent toward human beings: the spirit of a friend; an evil spirit.

excerpts from Dictionary.com

1. The spirit of a dead person, especially one believed to appear in bodily likeness to living persons or to haunt former habitats.

2. The center of spiritual life; the soul.

3. A demon or spirit.

4. A returning or haunting memory or image.

5. 1. A slight or faint trace: just a ghost of a smile.

2. The tiniest bit: not a ghost of a chance.

3. A secondary image on a television or radar screen caused by reflected waves.

4. A displaced image in a photograph caused by the optical system of the camera.

5. A false spectral line caused by imperfections in the diffraction grating.

6. A displaced image in a mirror caused by reflection from the front of the glass.

7. A nonexistent publication listed in bibliographies.

8. A fictitious employee or business.

6. A faint, false image, as: 1. A secondary image on a television or radar screen caused by reflected waves.

2. A displaced image in a photograph caused by the optical system of the camera.

3. A false spectral line caused by imperfections in the diffraction grating.

4. A displaced image in a mirror caused by reflection from the front of the glass.

5. A nonexistent publication listed in bibliographies.

6. A fictitious employee or business.

7. Informal A ghostwriter.

8. 1. A nonexistent publication listed in bibliographies.

2. A fictitious employee or business. 9. Physiology A red blood cell having no hemoglobin. v. ghost·ed, ghost·ing, ghosts v. intr.

1. Informal To engage in ghostwriting.

2. To move noiselessly like a ghost: "Two young deer ghosted out of the woods" (Nancy M. Debevoise). v. tr.

1. To haunt. 2. Informal To ghostwrite: was hired to ghost the memoirs of a famous executive. [Middle English gost, from Old English gāst, breath, spirit.] ghost'y adj. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2009 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. Cite This Source Slang Dictionary ghost (so)

1. tv. to kill someone. : Mooshoo threatened to ghost the guy. Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition. Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw Hill. Cite This Source

Ghost: A person's actual living undead memeory and persona floating freely in our world still effecting us though the actual mortal body and shell has fallen away in death.

And of course that is a simple explaniation.

Ghosts are us. Or were, us.

A Ghosts is as we are a collection of memories of expierencies that make us who we are.

So what makes you reading this not a ghost?

We as living beings, live.

We move.

And we effect our surroundings.

A ghost has been defined as the disembodied spirit or soul of a deceased person, although in popular usage the term refers only to the apparition of such a person. Often described as immaterial and partly transparent, ghosts are reported to haunt particular locations or people that they were associated with in life or at time of death

Ghosts Around The World

There is no Thai who does not know Mae Naak. While mentioning her can make young children run and scream hysterically in the "Nang Naak game", mothers invoke Mae Naak's name to quiet their crying infants; otherwise, the ghost might break their necks and eat their heads with chilly sauce. The gothic tale of Mae Naak Phra Khanong has been filmed more than twenty times; moreover, every one of them is a box-office hit. Thai youths grow up watching her ghostly tale on television.

The krasue (or Kra-Sue) is part of Southeast Asian mythology and is part of popular folklore in Cambodia, Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia and Thailand. It is the floating head of a vampiric female ghost. Intestines hang out of the ghost's neck and trail behind the head. In Laos the Krasue is called Pi-Kasu. In the Philippines, it is called Manananggal. In Cambodia, is called Arp, while in Malaysia and Indonesia, it is called Penanggalan or Hantu Penanggal. A Krasue Or Arb manifests itself as a beautiful woman. It floats through the air because it has no lower body. It appears as a length of intestines suspended from a lovely woman's face. The appearance of this spirit could be young or old. They mostly believe it as a rich person with the black gass or ties the black ribbon around the head and neck as protection from the sunshine. The spirit described the possessesion of an evil spirit into a woman which turns her into a flying vampire head with intestines hanging from the neck after the separation of the head from the body. The hunting action always happens on the night or evening when it flies, seeking for the blood or raw food.

Fillipina creature, Manananggal, Krasue sometimes prey on pregnant women in their homes just before or after the childbirth, using an elongated proboscis-like tongue and sharp teeth to eat the fetus or its Placenta. To protect the pregnant victims before birth, their relatives cleverly keep a lot of thorns around the house to scare the Krasue coming to suck the blood and many other disgusting stuff which lead the victims to suffer many diseases, and after the birth, they must take the cut placenta far away for burial to hide it from the Krasue. In the belief that a spirit can't find it well if the placenta is buried deep enough. To crush the still body which can be left sleeping or sitting is fatal to the spirit. The Flying head will return after hunting but rejoin with the wrong body which lead them to suffer pain until death. The creature will surely die if the intestines get cut off or if its body disappears or gets hidden by someone. If the top part of the body fails to find the lower half before daybreak it will die if it does not rejoin the other half when sunlight comes. Other religions believe that the creature can be destroyed by burning them alive. Heredity Many religious believe that Heredity to becoming the spirit originally come from The Pysical or Supernatural combination when someone try to learning the black art in Hindo Culture which appeared them to separate their head and body if they make the mistake or study the wrong magic. The Sins also is a relation to Krasue Heredity for the ones who aborted or killed someone in the pass life, will receive a punishment to become Krasue. Another story refer to a person which later become the Krasue, had Contaminating by eat or drink the meal with the old krasue's sailver or flesh. It mostly happened to the witch's relative especially their daughter or granddaughter. Origins The Nature of Krasue Spirit localed On Hinduism religion come from India which later, spread to Cambodia which first lead the birth of Krasue Spirit by its Dark art and Witch Cursed. It was providing the local religions for long times until the war and refugee happened to took a place in another Country.In Thailand, A story of a Khmer princess become the krasue in Thailand at mids 1700s during the Dark age of Cambodia within the losing of war with many country, had told as the first thai Krasue. The Legend had reminded on Thai Horror film Demonic Beauty'. Adaptations A lot of Countries of Believing The Krasue tale had adapted it into the Screen.Several Thai films depict the krasue, including Krasue (Demonic Beauty) in 2002, 2006's Krasue Valentine by Yuthlert Sippapak, the Cambodian film, 2004 horror film Nieng Arp (Lady Vampire) or Burn the witch , Hong Kong's Witch with the Flying Head (1977) and Indonesia's Mystics In Bali (1981). It was also comically featured in a Sylvania light bulb commercial for Thai audiences.

Another widespread belief concerning ghosts is that they were composed of a misty, airy, or subtle material. Anthropologists speculate that this may also stem from early beliefs that ghosts were the person within the person (the person's spirit), most noticeable in ancient cultures as a person's breath, which upon exhaling in colder climates appears visibly as a white mist.[18] This belief may have also fostered the metaphorical meaning of "breath" in certain languages, such as the Latin spiritus and the Greek pneuma, which by analogy became extended to mean the soul. In the Bible, God is depicted as animating Adam with a breath. In many traditional accounts, ghosts were often thought to be deceased people looking for vengeance, or imprisoned on earth for bad things they did during life. The appearance of a ghost has often been regarded as an omen or portent of death. Seeing one's own ghostly double or "fetch" is a related omen of death. White ladies were reported to appear in many rural areas, and supposed to have died tragically or suffered trauma in life. White Lady legends are found around the world. Common to many of them is the theme of losing or being betrayed by a husband or fiancé. They are often associated with an individual family line, as a harbinger of death. When one of these ghosts is seen it indicates that someone in the family is going to die, similar to a banshee. Legends of ghost ships have existed since the 18th century; most notable of these is the Flying Dutchman. This theme has been used in literature in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Coleridge.

Yūrei (幽霊?) are figures in Japanese folklore, analogous to Western legends of ghosts. The name consists of two kanji, 幽 (yū), meaning "faint" or "dim" and 霊 (rei), meaning "soul" or "spirit." Like their Western counterparts, they are thought to be spirits kept from a peaceful afterlife. See also Yokai, Obake. Ancestor worship is central to Chinese folk religion. Other than the Qingming and Chongyang festivals, descendants should pay tributes to ancestors during the Zhongyuanjie, more commonly known as the Ghost Festival. Traditionally, other than the tombstones or urn-covers, descendants are expected to install altar (神台) in their homes to which they would pay homage regularly in the day, with joss sticks and tea. The ancestors, parents or grandparents, are worshiped or venerated as if they are still living. See also Chinese ghosts, Ghosts in Malay culture, ghost money, Hell bank note. The Hindu Garuda Purana discusses ghosts.

Ghosts in Bengali culture are a recurrent motives both in fairy tales and in modern day Bengali literature as well, references to ghosts may be often found. It is believed that the spirits of those who cannot find peace in the afterlife or die unnatural deaths remain on Earth. The common word for ghosts in Bengali is bhut ( ভূত). In Central and Northern Asia, Shaman spirit guides play a central role. Near East and Mediterranean The Greek underworld (Tartarus) from its Near Eastern templates (compare Hebrew Gehenna and Babylonian Kurnugia), depicts the spirits of the deceased as "shadows" languishing underground. They can be visited by heroes venturing a descent to the underworld, or they can be conjured as apparitions by seers or necromancers. The Christian Hell is a direct continuation of these underworlds. The Greek Hero cult involved the apotheosis of selected individuals after their death. Ishara was a Near Eastern goddess associated with the underworld. Her name may continue a Proto-Indo-European notion, cognate to Welsh Gwen-hwyfar (Irish Find-abair, from Proto-Celtic *windo-seibaro- "white ghost". Pre-Columbian Americas In Aztec mythology, the Cihuateteo were the spirits of human women who died in childbirth. They haunted crossroads at night, stealing children and causing sicknesses, especially seizures and madness, and seducing men to sexual misbehavior.

Some researchers, such as Professor Michael Persinger (Laurentian University, Canada), have speculated that changes in geomagnetic fields (created, e.g., by tectonic stresses in the Earth's crust or solar activity) could stimulate the brain's temporal lobes and produce many of the experiences associated with hauntings. This theory has been tested in various ways. Some scientists have examined the relationship between the time of onset of unusual phenomena in allegedly haunted locations and any sudden increases in global geomagnetic activity. Others have investigated whether the location of alleged hauntings is associated with certain types of magnetic activity. Finally, a third strand of work has involved laboratory studies in which stimulation of the temporal lobe with transcerebral magnetic fields has elicited subjective experiences that strongly parallel phenomena associated with hauntings. All of this work is controversial; it has attracted a large amount of debate and disagreement. Sound is thought to be another cause of supposed sightings. Frequencies lower than 20 hertz are called infrasound and are normally inaudible, but scientists Richard Lord and Richard Wiseman have concluded that infrasound can cause humans to experience bizarre feelings in a room, such as anxiety, extreme sorrow, a feeling of being watched, or even the chills. Carbon monoxide poisoning, which can cause changes in perception of the visual and auditory systems, was recognized as a possible explanation for haunted houses as early as 1921. According to the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, to date, there is no credible scientific evidence that any location is inhabited by spirits of the dead. Critics of "eyewitness ghost sightings" suggest that limitations of human perception and ordinary physical explanations can account for such sightings; for example, air pressure changes in a home causing doors to slam, or lights from a passing car are reflected through a window at night.[67] Pareidolia, an innate tendency to recognize patterns in random perceptions, is what some skeptics believe causes people to believe that they have seen ghosts.[68] Reports of ghosts "seen out of the corner of the eye" may be accounted for by the sensitivity of human peripheral vision. According to skeptical investigator Joe Nickell: ...peripheral vision is very sensitive and can easily mislead, especially late at night, when the brain is tired and more likely to misinterpret sights and sounds.

Nickell also states that a person's belief that a location is haunted may cause them to interpret mundane events as confirmations of a haunting: Once the idea of a ghost appears in a household . . . no longer is an object merely mislaid. . . . There gets to be a dynamic in a place where the idea that it's haunted takes on a life of its own. One-of-a-kind quirks that could never be repeated all become further evidence of the haunting.