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Brad and Sherry Steiger


Please Visit his Official Web Site ~ edwardshanahan.com

Conscious Channeler Edward Shanahan





 

 

 

Lisa Lee Harp Waugh's:

The 2011 Most Haunted State To Hunt Ghost In America

Lisa Lee Harp Waugh

 

Each year The great American Necromancer, Lisa Lee Harp Waugh has tallied, investigated and actually documented her findings and research on the most haunted States in America.

Waugh does this personally by ranking them on all the info of actual paranormal activity and research going on in a particular State of the Union. Her Personal encounters, Emails from friends and those that seek her out help her keep an eye on the paranormal front.

 

 

This year many locations it seems have kept solid positioning on the list. A few locations have actually jumped into the haunted spotlight.

Louisiana holds it's number one haunted location status in the United States once again. News of haunting's, The Devil Baby, Loup Garous, Bigfoot type Swamp creatures, Grunch (American Chupacabra) and Vampire and zombie activity keep it in the number one spot. Haunted Cemteries, houses, Plantations, and buildings. So it seems everything is haunted by some type of spook in this great haunted state.

Voodoo legends, vampires, pirate ghouls and ghosts are all waiting to haunt you in every part of the state. Come and learn why Louisiana is considered by many to be one of the most Haunted States in the Nation.

Find out why some Louisiana State workers say the ghost of a late Governor still haunts the halls of the State Capital Building in Baton Rouge where he was assassinated.

Visit Haunted New Orleans where Mardi Gras and real voodoo hoodoo loa's and lost spirits rule the streets. Also visit the world famous "Cities of the Dead" and they are as active as that of the living. Haunted Tours, And Urban Legends abound.

Stroll beneath shady, 400 year old oak trees draped in Spanish moss. Come and explore for yourself - see why so many spooky old Haunted Plantations along the levees of the Mighty Mississippi River never quite give up all their ghostly secrets.

Texas hauntings, Encounters with cryptids, UFO's and mysterious happenings seem to be on the rise this year. Making the state gain the number three spot. Places like haunted Galveston and Marshall, Texas are the most haunted spots where Lone Star Spirits and ghosts or encountered most.

Restless spirits of the Old West, cowboys, Native Americans, cattle rustlers, pioneers and patriots -- these are just a few of the spirits that haunt the dusty roads and old trails of Haunted Texas.

Ghostly missions and frontier churches and the famous Alamo are just a hint of what lies within the borders of the Lone Star State.

 

The Alamo, where Texas patriots valiantly defended their independence and freedom until they were overcome by the superior forces of Mexican General Santa Ana, is today one of the most visited locales in all of Texas. Numerous reports of sightings of patriot defenders and Mexican soldiers have surfaced over the years, and more and more photos are being submitted with anomalies that are hard to be explained away as anything but evidence that the Alamo is the Most Haunted Destination in all of Texas.

According to local legend the visitors' center at Monahan's Sandhills State Park is built on the sight of an eighteenth-century Comanche burial ground. The haunted Visitor's Center has sent a chill down the spine of many tourists and locals alike. Visitor's Center Ghost Photos show many spirits still lingering around the burial grounds. Could this be the remnant souls of long dead Native Americans, trapped between the worlds?

Galveston, on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, was founded by the Louisiana Pirate Jean Lafitte. His devil dogs the Campeche ghost fogs still haunt the island today, or so the story goes. As one of the most distant sites of his far-flung buccaneer territory, Galveston is said to still be haunted by the spirit of Lafitte and his pirate crews. Sightings of a ghostly frigate, possibly Lafitte's famous "Barataria Bay," are still reported today, complete with the calls of the crew as they hoist the ghostly sails. Others have seen Lafitte himself, or so they say, walking the streets of the oldest parts of Galveston, and members of the ghostly pirate crew have also been sighted, only to disappear as they approach.

With fierce wind and torrential rains, hurricanes have pounded the Texas coast for centuries. With great loss of life and property, native Texans have withstood the natural onslaughts as best they can. But not without sacrifice. It is said that sometimes the mournful cries of those lost in the great hurricane floods can still be heard on especially stormy nights, from Corpus Christi to Galveston, the reports continue to come in.

Ghosts of Civil War soldiers still reenact the last battles of their lives in remote places all across the Lone Star State. The last casualty of the entire war was a Texan, fighting as the patriots before him to keep the Northern "invaders" from his lands. Some say his ghost is not alone among the graves and brush fields of the lonesome Texas battlefields.

 

The ghosts of great Cattlemen still ride the fences and borders of the ranges they protected in life. Pioneers on their way to better fortunes in the gold rush cities of Arizona and California, who sometimes never made it and were buried in shallow graves beside the road, still haunt the lonely overgrown paths of the Texas "outback." One touching legend, of a six year old girl who succumbed to scarlet fever on the wagon train road and who was buried in a remote location with a makeshift cross and crude stones to cover her -- it is said that her forlorn ghost still haunts the road in search of the wagons now long gone that left her behind.

Many people still insist that riders of the Pony Express still gallop wildly past them as they camp in the deep Texas night. One lonely rancher reports that a ghostly entity still repairs the fences of his property that line the old Pony Express road. And the demons and Marshall's Stagecoach road still haunt the living today on a regular basis.

You might just want to join in a sacred indian Ghost Dance and see for yourself the spirits manifesting in the Native American ritual, just as they have for the Ancestors before.

Or you might relax and watch that special Texas sunset with a cold Lone Star beer in your hand and ponder the ghosts that might be sitting next to you. Especially The most haunteds city in Texas, Marshall!

 

 

Lisa Lee Harp Waugh's The 2011 Most Haunted State To Hunt Ghost In America

ALPHABETICAL ORDER

RANK ORDER

2007 RANK

STATE

2008 RANK

STATE

2009 RANK

STATE

2010 RANK

STATE

2011 RANK

STATE

17

Alabama

1

Louisiana

1

Louisiana

1

Louisiana

1

Louisiana

7

Alaska

2

New Mexico

2

New Mexico

2

Pennsylvania

2

Pennsylvania

3

Arizona

3

Arizona

3

Texas

3

Texas

3

California

13

Arkansas

4

Maryland

4

Rhode Island

4

Rhode Island

4

Rhode Island

9

California

5

Tennessee

5

Tennessee

5

Tennessee

5

Tennessee

22

Colorado

6

South Carolina

6

South Carolina

6

South Carolina

6

Nevada

40

Connecticut

7

Alaska

7

Alaska

7

Alaska

7

Texas

18

Delaware

8

Florida

8

Florida

8

Florida

8

Florida

8

Florida

9

California

9

California

9

California

9

Missouri

20

Georgia

10

Nevada

10

Nevada

10

Nevada

10

South Carolina

28

Hawaii

11

Michigan

11

Michigan

11

Michigan

11

Michigan

39

Idaho

12

Texas

12

Arizona

12

Arizona

12

Alabama

21

Illinois

13

Arkansas

13

Arkansas

13

Arkansas

13

Arkansas

25

Indiana

14

Washington

14

Washington

14

Washington

14

Oklahoma

43

Iowa

15

Oklahoma

15

Oklahoma

15

Oklahoma

15

Washington

27

Kansas

16

North Carolina

16

Alabama

16

Alabama

16

Arizona

34

Kentucky

17

Alabama

17

North Carolina

17

North Carolina

17

North Carolina

1

Louisiana

18

Delaware

18

Mississippi

18

Missouri

18

Alaska

48

Maine

19

Missouri

19

Missouri

19

Mississippi

19

Maryland

4

Maryland

20

Georgia

20

Connecticut

20

Connecticut

20

Connecticut

30

Massachusetts

21

Illinois

21

Illinois

21

Illinois

21

Illinois

11

Michigan

22

Colorado

22

Maryland

22

Maryland

22

Mississippi

32

Minnesota

23

Ohio

23

Oregon

23

Oregon

23

Oregon

24

Mississippi

24

Mississippi

24

Delaware

24

Delaware

24

Delaware

19

Missouri

25

Indiana

25

Indiana

25

Indiana

25

Indiana

44

Montana

26

Pennsylvania

26

Pennsylvania

26

New Mexico

26

New Mexico

37

Nebraska

27

Kansas

27

Kansas

27

Kansas

27

Kansas

10

Nevada

28

Hawaii

28

Hawaii

28

Hawaii

28

Hawaii

47

New Hampshire

29

Oregon

29

Idaho

29

Idaho

29

Idaho

33

New Jersey

30

Massachusetts

30

Massachusetts

30

Massachusetts

30

Massachusetts

2

New Mexico

31

New York

31

Utah

31

Utah

31

Utah

31

New York

32

Minnesota

32

Minnesota

32

Minnesota

32

Minnesota

16

North Carolina

33

New Jersey

33

New Jersey

33

New Jersey

33

New Jersey

50

North Dakota

34

Kentucky

34

Kentucky

34

Kentucky

34

Kentucky

23

Ohio

35

Rhode Island

35

Colorado

35

Colorado

35

Colorado

15

Oklahoma

36

Virginia

36

Virginia

36

Virginia

36

Virginia

29

Oregon

37

Nebraska

37

Maine

37

Maine

37

Maine

26

Pennsylvania

38

Utah

38

New York

38

New York

38

New York

35

Rhode Island

39

Idaho

39

Ohio

39

Ohio

39

Ohio

6

South Carolina

40

Connecticut

40

Georgia

40

Georgia

40

Georgia

45

South Dakota

41

West Virginia

41

West Virginia

41

West Virginia

41

West Virginia

5

Tennessee

42

Wisconsin

42

Wisconsin

42

Wisconsin

42

Wisconsin

12

Texas

43

Iowa

43

Iowa

43

Iowa

43

Iowa

38

Utah

44

Montana

44

Montana

44

Montana

44

Montana

49

Vermont

45

South Dakota

45

South Dakota

45

South Dakota

45

South Dakota

36

Virginia

46

Wyoming

46

Wyoming

46

Wyoming

46

Wyoming

14

Washington

47

New Hampshire

47

New Hampshire

47

New Hampshire

47

New Hampshire

41

West Virginia

48

Maine

48

Nebraska

48

Nebraska

48

Nebraska

42

Wisconsin

49

Vermont

49

Vermont

49

Vermont

49

Vermont

46

Wyoming

50

North Dakota

50

North Dakota

50

North Dakota

50

North Dakota

Haunted Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has a past steeped in history and drama. Here the fledgling American republic was nurtured into being by our founding fathers; here the architecture of cities and towns was designed to make the spirit of liberty soar in the common man; here slaves experienced the first footsteps of freedom, debarking from the "Underground Railroad," even as the fields of Gettysburg ran red with the blood of Confederate soldiers who would bring them back to bondage and of Union men who died there to keep them free. Wherever there is such a tangled history there are always stories of ghosts and hauntings. Two hundred haunted years have left an indelible mark on the state of brotherhood and reports of the strange and anomalous continue to this very day detailing the wide variety of hauntings experienced throughout the state. Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, has its share of hauntings. It has been said that the Liberty Bell still rings occasionally and that founding father William Penn is still seen visiting sites he knew in his own time. Perhaps he is making certain that everything is still being kept in order as he would like? There are reports from homes around the Old City that tell of the whimpers and sighs of long ago slaves who once hid within the walls and under the floors of the old buildings, a stop on the Underground Railroad and one step closer to freedom. There is the story of the carriage that still tramples wildly over the cobblestones of the Old City; some say it is the carriage that bore away the slave Daniel Dangerfield to freedom instead of to the hangman's noose. Hoofbeats and gunshots accompany the sound as it thunders through the Old City and into oblivion. Then there is Gettysburg. The site of three days of blood and destruction, this little Pennsylvania town became the crucible turning point of the American Civil War when Union and Confederate troops met here in July of 1863. Men cut down in their prime, the heat and fear of battle, the dead and dying, the innocent killed: All these have left an indelible imprint on the once peaceful little town, and although crowds of tourists, history buffs and ghost hunters now clutter the streets and fields, Gettysburg never fails to disappoint. There are reports of soldiers still locked in combat, doomed to fighting out the same battle for all eternity. There are those who have heard the sounds of soldiers moaning wounded in the fields, or marching lost through the grassy expanses once littered with the dead and dying. Ghosts are not limited to the battlefield in Gettysburg and many homes in and around the little town have spirits with stories still to tell. In the surrounding countryside there are tales as old as freedom, tales of the strange and unusual that come down to us from the old timers who forged livings from the coal mines of Pennsylvania's rocky mountain slopes.

 

Arizona, Alabama, North Carolina reports and investigations seem to be leveling out. As what seems to be a unfortunate move Georgia seems to be fast becoming one of the least haunted states only beating out West Virginia, Wisconsin, Iowa, Montana, South Dakota, Wyoming,New Hampshire, Nebraska, Vermont and North Dakota as the least haunted State in America.

 

Also please see: HOW TO BECOME REAL FAMOUS IN A PARANORMAL WORLD!

http://www.hauntedamericatours.com/ghosthunting/Thinkagain.php

Think you know what a real ghost won't or can't do? : http://www.hauntedamericatours.com/ghosthunting/Thinkagain.php

 

Visit even the smallest of towns in the U.S. and you’re likely to hear some local ghost stories and discover a few haunted houses. But some American cities have gained the reputation for being particularly ghost-ridden thanks to their rich and often bizarre historical backgrounds. The following are ten of the most haunted cities to steer away from—or toward, if you dare—this Halloween.

10. San Francisco, California

San Francisco’s rich cultural makeup, large immigrant population, and a history of natural disasters like earthquakes have helped it develop a reputation as a Mecca of all things haunted. Chinatown alone is home to countless ghost tours and creepy folklore, but the city also boasts a wealth of haunted hotels, mansions, and army bases. Of these, one of the most famous is the Queen Anne Hotel, which served as a school for girls in the 1890s and is said to be haunted by the ghost of its former headmistress, Mary Lake. There are also a number of stories concerning Mary Anne Pleasant, the so-called “Voodoo Queen of San Francisco,” who was a former slave and abolitionist who used a knowledge of the black arts to gain wealth and influence among the city’s elite. Even the trendy San Francisco Art Institute, which is rumored to have been built on top of a graveyard that housed victims of the 1906 earthquake, is said to be the home of several ghosts who have frequently been seen climbing the stairs to a tower that overlooks the ancient cemetery.

Most Haunted Place: Alcatraz

alcatraz

Alcatraz Island is one of San Francisco’s most famous landmarks, but the former maximum-security prison is also home to some of the city’s weirdest ghost stories. Visitors to the island often claim to see apparitions walking the cellblocks, and sometimes hear voices emanating from what was once the cafeteria.

9. Key West, Florida

Sunny Key West might not seem like the most probable setting for haunted houses, but this small beach community is home to some of the oldest—and downright creepiest—of all ghost stories. The city’s rich history of buccaneers and rumrunners provides the backdrop for a lot of these ghosts, like those that are said haunt Captain Tony’s Saloon. Before it was a bar, Captain Tony’s was supposedly the location of the island’s morgue, and the tree that grows through the building’s center is said to have been a major site for lynching pirates and other criminals, and many are said to still haunt the premises today. Other local ghost stories concern the writer Ernest Hemingway, who kept a home on Key West for some thirty years. Hemingway’s house, now a museum dedicated to his life and work, is said to house the novelist’s ghost. Some visitors and workers claim to see him walking the grounds, while others have heard the clicking of his typewriter coming from inside the main house.

Most Haunted: Robert the Doll

robert-the-doll-large

The island’s art and historical museum isn’t haunted, but it does contain one of the creepiest artifacts of Key West’s history in the form of Robert, a large doll that many claim is possessed. The doll was given to painter Gene Otto in the early 1900s, and the young boy soon became deathly afraid of it, as he said it would often threaten him and wake him in the night by throwing furniture around the room. The boy’s parents would often swear they saw the doll moving, and neighbors claimed they often spotted Robert pacing in front of the windows of the house when the family was away.

8. Athens, Ohio

Athens, Ohio is a small town that is home to the Ohio University as well as some downright strange ghost stories. This small, otherwise peaceful community has inspired stories of hauntings that include everything from a headless train conductor to pagan cults and the violent murders of livestock. Many claim that when plotted on a map, the city’s five major graveyards form the symbol of a pentagram, and strange rituals are at the center of many of Athens’ most famous ghost tales. A lot of these stories date back over a hundred years, when the town became associated with the Spiritualist movement of the 1800s. The most famous tells of Jonathan Koons, a poor farmer who was instructed by ghosts to build a “spirit room” in which apparitions would then manifest and communicate with him from beyond the grave.

Most Haunted Place: Athens Lunatic Asylum

Ridges_ballroom

Night Shift Staff

Night Shift Staff

There’s nothing creepier than a good old-fashioned insane asylum, and Athens has one of the most famous in the form of the Athens Lunatic Asylum, which operated from 1874 until 1993. The hospital held many violent patients, and is notorious for being the site of hundreds of lobotomies. Since closing, the hospital has been the at the center of numerous ghost stories, most of which are kept alive by the students at the university, which now owns the asylum grounds. The most famous of these concerns Margaret, a deaf-mute patient who supposedly escaped from her room, accidentally became trapped in an abandoned ward, and eventually died of exposure. Her decomposing body was found weeks later, and supposedly the stain that was left on the floor of the ward can still be seen today.

7. Portland, Oregon

Portland, Oregon has developed a reputation as the most haunted city of the Pacific Northwest thanks to its bizarre history and high number of ghost sightings. One of the city’s most famous haunted houses is Pittock Mansion, an ornate house that was built in 1914 by a wealthy businessman and his wife, both of whom died shortly thereafter. Visitors have claimed to have seen apparitions and heard footsteps coming from empty rooms, and doors and windows will sometimes open by themselves. Weirdest of all, a portrait of Mr. Pittock, the man who built the house, will inexplicably be found in different parts of the house, as though it can move itself from room to room. In addition to the Pittock house, other Portland haunted places include the Bagdad theater, a movie theater built during the roaring 20s that supposedly houses a number of spirits, and the Willamette river, where in recent years a phantom rowboat has been spotted by several people.

Most Haunted Place: Shanghai Tunnels

shanghai-tunnels

Portland’s coastal location established it as a shipping hub and port of call for sailors during the 1800s. This eventually led to the rise of a practice known as shanghaiing, wherein unsuspecting men and women were kidnapped from bars or hotels, shipped to the Orient, and impressed into slave labor or prostitution. Portland was notorious for this practice thanks to a series of labyrinthine underground tunnels that run beneath the city streets, which were used by the Shanghaiiers as a safe way to capture and transfer victims to the harbor without being seen. Today, the tunnels are said to be haunted by the ghosts of the people who were kidnapped, many of whom were never seen or heard from again.

6. Charleston, South Carolina

Known as the “Holy City” for the church spires that dot its skyline, Charleston is one of the oldest cities in the U.S., and also one of the most haunted. Victorian mansions line the downtown area known as the Battery, which was a protective artillery installation during the Civil War, and it is here that many of the city’s most haunted houses can be found. Perhaps the most famous is the Battery Carriage House Inn, a hotel where people have reported seeing everything from strange lights, to the gentlemanly ghost of a student who died after leaping off the roof, to a headless torso that appears at guests’ bedsides in the middle of the night. Charleston is also known for a number of ghost stories that originated with the Gullah, a West African culture that populates parts of South Carolina and Georgia. The most famous Gullah horror stories usually center on Boo Hags, a type of blood-red vampire that wears human skin as a mask and feeds on its victim’s energy while they sleep.

Most Haunted Place: the Dock Street Theater

dock-street-theater

Charleston is full of buildings with a checkered past, and one of the most well known is surely the Dock Street Theater. Built in 1809, the theater is said to be the home of two spirits. The first is Nettie, a poor prostitute who was killed near the theater after being struck by lightning. The other is the ghost of Junius Brutus Booth, an actor who is more famous today for being the father of John Wilkes Boothe, the man who killed Abraham Lincoln. Both spirits are said to wander the backstage area of the theater, and many workers and performers claim to have spotted them.

5. Salem, Massachusetts

In 1692, Salem, Mass. became the sight of a series of infamous trials after three local women were accused of using witchcraft to terrorize a trio of young girls. The trials soon escalated into mass hysteria, with townspeople vehemently accusing neighbors and acquaintances, almost all of them unmarried women, of being witches. Over 150 people were arrested and charged, and as may as 19 were eventually executed by hanging. Today, the town of Salem encourages its reputation as “Witch City, USA” and has one of the biggest Halloween celebrations in the country. Alongside the tourist shops and museums, though, stand several infamous ghost stories related to the witch trials. One in particular concerns Gallows Hill, the site of several hangings, which is said to be haunted by the spirits of the 19 people lynched for being witches.

Most Haunted Place: Joshua Ward House

ward_house

Known as one of the most haunted houses in America, Joshua Ward House is built on the foundation of the home of George Corwin, the man who served as Sheriff during the Salem witch trials. Corwin is infamous for his role in the death of Giles Corey, a local man who was charged with witchcraft. When Corey refused to enter a plea in court, Corwin used an old English legal precedent and placed him under a board piled with rocks in order to coerce him into talking. Corey never relented, and was eventually crushed to death under the massive weight. To this day, many claim that Corey and Corwin, who is rumored to be buried beneath the foundation of his old home, haunt the Joshua Ward House.

4. Chicago, Illinois

Thanks to its famous great fire and history of gangsters and underworld criminals like Al Capone, Chicago has developed quite a reputation for being haunted. The city has a number of well known ghost stories that are whispered among the locals each Halloween, and perhaps none is more famous that the story of Resurrection Mary. As the story goes, Mary was a young girl who was hit and killed by a car while leaving a dance hall with her boyfriend. She was buried in nearby Resurrection Cemetery, and ever since she can be periodically seen wandering the streets in her white burial dress, still trying to find her way back home. Another famous story concerns what has come to be known as the “Devil Baby of Hull House,” a child born with scaly skin and a pointed tail who supposedly haunts the house once owned by famed activist Jane Addams.

Most Haunted Place: Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery

Bachelors_grove_IR

Rumored to be one of the prohibition-era gangsters’ favorite places to dump bodies, Bachelor’s Grove is an old and decaying burial ground that has been the site of countless stories about ghosts, spirits, and devil worship. Several headstones in the cemetery seem to move at will, and many claim that the spirits of the dead often materialize and walk the grounds at night. The most famous of these is the “White Lady,” the ghost of a young woman who is always seen in a white dress, often cradling a baby in her arms. Photo: http://www.bachelors-grove.com/

3. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

In July of 1863, the small college town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania was the site of the biggest military clash of the Civil War, which to this day remains the bloodiest event to ever occur on American soil. Over 150,000 total soldiers converged on the scene, and when the battle was over as many as 50,000 were killed, wounded, or missing. The shadow of the battle still stands over the town today, and many claim the ghosts of dead soldiers haunt the battlefields. What’s unique about Gettysburg is the sheer amount and frequency of its ghost sightings. Some places in the town, like the home of Jenny Wade, a woman who was killed by a stray bullet from the battle, supposedly experience paranormal activity on a daily basis. Elsewhere, there have even been reports of lone visitors to the battlefield park stumbling across what they assume to be a battle reenactment, only to later learn that none took place that day.

Most Haunted Place: The Devil’s Den

Devil's_Den_Gettysburg_1909

755px-Confederate_Dead_at_Devil's_Den_Gettysburg

The Devil’s Den is a rocky outcropping of boulders and shrubs that was the site of one of the clashes of the second day of the battle. The spot is famous for being the location of a small skirmish that took place when a Union artillery unit returned fire on a Confederate sharpshooter who was taking shots at them from behind the rocks. They later found a body, and photographer Alexander Gardner took a photo of it that has since become one of the most iconic images of the battle. But recent evidence suggests that the body in the photo was not the man responsible, and some even claim that Gardner dragged the corpse of another man to the spot in order to stage the picture. Supposedly, this man’s ghost now haunts the Devil’s Den, and to this day visitors to the park often have a great deal of trouble trying to take photos anywhere near the site. Pictures often come out blurry and unusable, and cameras have a strange way of suddenly dying whenever they are turned on in the area.

2. Savannah, Georgia

With its many cemeteries, gothic mansions, and trees covered in hanging Spanish moss, Savannah, GA fits the bill of a haunted city about as well as any town in America. It was one of only a few places that escaped being burned during Sherman’s famous “March to the Sea” during the Civil War, and so it still contains a good deal of antebellum architecture that serves as a perfect breeding ground for ghost stories. One example is the Pirates’ House, a restaurant that in the late 1700s served as a pub for a notoriously rough clientele of sailors and buccaneers. As in Portland, shanghaiing was a common practice, and unsuspecting or drunk patrons were often waylaid and then dragged to the harbor via a series of underground tunnels connected to the bar’s rum cellar. To this day, many consider the cellar to be haunted, and it is said that at night the sounds of drunken sailors singing can still be heard.

Most Haunted Place: The Hampton Lillibridge House

Hampton-Lillibridge-House

The Hampton Lillibridge house is an assuming three-story building that was built in 1796 and originally served as a boarding house. It was purchased in the 1960s by a builder who hoped to restore it, and it was then that strange phenomena began to occur. At one point during construction, a portion of the roof collapsed, killing one of the workers. Other builders claimed they would hear voices and footsteps whenever they were alone, and that pieces of construction equipment would often be thrown across the room. Even creepier, they said they often spotted a man in a black suit staring at them from inside the house. Countless exorcisms and investigations have taken place at the house since, and it has gone through several owners, but the presence that haunts it is said to still remain there today.

1. New Orleans, Louisiana

All southern port towns have their share of ghost stories, but none more so than New Orleans, which has truly embraced its reputation as a center of all things paranormal. All of the criteria that tend to produce ghost legends—a coastal location, a checkered past, a rich cultural history, and a potent mix of old and new world religion— can be found here. The city is full of haunted mansions, taverns, and graveyards, and you can’t go far without hearing stories of cursed pirate ships, Civil War-era spirits, and voodoo hexes. In this realm, one of the most famous figures is undoubtedly Marie Laveau, a Creole woman who gained a massive following during the 1800s as one of the first practitioners of voodoo. She died in 1881, but for years after many people claimed to see her walking throughout the French Quarter, and more than 120 years later many ghostly legends about the “Voodoo Queen of New Orleans” still persist.

Most Haunted Place: LaLaurie House

LaLaurie-House

In the heart of the French Quarter lies an ornate mansion that in the 1800s belonged to physician Louis LaLaurie and his socialite wife Delphine. As the story goes, it was rumored at the time that the couple treated their slaves viciously, and there was evidence Lady LaLaurie was responsible for the murder of a 12-year-old girl. The rumors were validated when one night a fire broke out in the mansion’s kitchen. Firemen raced to the scene, and when they kicked down a door to the slave quarters they were astonished to find several slaves chained to the wall in a kind of makeshift dungeon. Many have since claimed that the LaLaurie’s were performing grotesque surgical experiments on the slaves, but modern evidence suggests that this is probably an exaggeration. Either way, the sadistic couple is said to have soon fled the city, and Lady LaLaurie eventually disappeared. The mansion where the horrors took place still stands today, and several ghosts have been sighted, among them the spirits of both Delphine LaLaurie and the young slave girl she is said to have murdered.

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10 Most Haunted Places in America

Here is an account of the 10 most haunted places in America that are intriguing and inexplicable.
10 Most   Haunted Places in America
Do ghosts really exist? It’s one of those age-old questions that have not been answered conclusively yet. However, there is no denying the fact that people across cultures around the world, and across time periods that go back to antiquity, have consistently claimed to have seen ghosts, experienced places that have been haunted, and have even photographed them. Of course skeptics refute such experiences as mere figments of an over-active imagination, and as for photography, well, we all know how they can be either manipulated or be distorted by some explainable phenomenon like a lens flare. Anyway, whether you are a diehard believer or an uncompromising skeptic, given below are the 10 most haunted places in America that can either raise your hackles or a titter.

Gettysburg, in Pennsylvania: Most people who follow the ups and downs of the Civil War in America would acknowledge that the battle that was fought in Gettysburg was the turning point, leading to the defeat of the Confederacy. The battle, which carried on for three days, and was fought in the surrounding hills and forests as well as in the town of Gettysburg itself, left almost a third of the men who fought in it dead. It’s no surprise then that with so much bloodshed and the ensuing horrors of houses and streets filled with the dead and dying, that there are innumerable accounts of various houses and hotels, like the Farnsworth House Inn and the Pennsylvania Hall, as well as the Gettysburg Battlefield, haunted by the ghosts of those soldiers.

Hornet, in Missouri: The Devil’s Promenade, a road that stretches for two miles, is notorious for being the site where an orange ball of light has been sighted every night since back in 1866. According to one legend, it is said that two Quapaw Indians who had been in love and committed suicide, appear as the orange light. However, another story claims that it is the lantern of the ghost of a miner who is searching for his abducted wife and children. This light, which is also referred to as the Devil’s Jack o’ Lantern, the Neosho Spook Light, and the Hornet Ghost Light, is said to leave behind traces of sparks and glowing light as it moves, dodges people and even enters cars. It was investigated by the Army Corps of Engineers in 1946 without any success, as well as the Ghost Research Society, which discovered that it was shaped like a diamond, the center of which was hollow.

Adams, in Tennessee: This sleepy town, where the John Bell Farm was located, is one of the haunted spots that are most famous in America. The saga of the Bell Witch began around 1817 when strange phenomena started being experienced by the Bell family. Initially, the family heard scratching sounds and rapping and knocking noises at the windows and doors of the house. Then the entity started threatening to kill John Bell. Later, John Bell was beaten up by the entity so severely that his tongue was swollen, and he could not eat. One day he was found unconscious in his bed with a strange bottle of some blackish liquid by his bed. John Bell never recovered, dying in 1820. But the Bell Witch was still not done with the family. Promising to wreak havoc on them, she returned to haunt them in 1827, in 1852, in 1861, in 1935, in 1977, and in 1988. Nowadays, the specter of a fiendish woman and strange balls of light are said to appear on the Bell farm. Then there is also the Bell Witch Cave close to the family cemetery which is supposed to be haunted by eerie screams and rattling chains.

Goldfield, in Nevada: The Goldfield Hotel, with 154 rooms was built over an old gold mine, which began operating first in 1908. later, it underwent extensive renovations. It is thought that this hotel is haunted by several ghosts. For example, in a small room at the west end, in the employees’ section, room number 109, appears a pregnant woman. She has been seen chained to a radiator in the room by psychics. It is said that she was a pregnant prostitute called Elizabeth, who was chained there by George Winfield, who owned the hotel originally. After she gave birth, Elizabeth was left chained in the room, where she died, while her baby was flung into an old shaft of the mine. In fact, the ghost of Elizabeth was even captured on photographic film by a reporter. It is also said that George Winfield’s ghost haunts the George Winfield Room, located on the first floor. George’s ghost has also been seen at the staircase near the lobby, where the ghosts of two children and a midget are also seen sometimes. A room on the third floor on the southwest side and the Theodore Roosevelt Room are also said to be filled with high psychic energy. According to some psychics, the Goldfield Hotel is supposed to be one amongst the seven portals that is supposed to reach across to the so-called ‘other side’ that is in existence today.

San Jose, in California: The Winchester Mansion, a Victorian style building with 160 rooms, was built in 1884 in San Jose by Sarah Winchester, who was a wealthy widow. It took construction workers 38 years to build it. The house includes a number of strange features, which were meant to prevent evil spirits from entering it such as false doors, as well as a séance room, where Sarah was supposed to have made the plans for the building which were said to have been given to her by spirits, and also a staircase leading up to the ceiling. It is said that Sarah Winchester spoke to the ghosts every night at midnight. And since then, organ music has been heard from the Blue Room, in which she died, as well as sightings of red colored balls of light, the aroma of chicken soup from the kitchen, cold spots, and apparitions.

St. Louis, in Missouri: It is said that the Lemp Mansion, which was built by the Lemp family, the makers of Falstaff beer, in the 1860s, is haunted by this family. The family, in fact, experienced a series of tragedies. It began with the death of the son of William Lemp in 1904, followed by William Lemp himself committing suicide. Then in 1920, his daughter too killed herself, followed by William Lemp, Jr., and then Charles Lemp. The house was then sold, becoming a boarding house, and after that it was turned into a restaurant in 1977, which is still in operation today. The staff and the people boarding here have claimed that they have experienced sensations of being watched, seen apparitions, heard strange noises and voices, tools vanishing, flying glasses, a piano being played by itself, and other eerie phenomena.

Ashland, in Masachusetts: There is an old pub, about 164 years old, here known as Captain John Stone’s Inn, which was used once a hiding place for slaves that had run away. This is also the place where Daniel Webster made his speeches. The staff and the customers of this pub claim seeing the specter of a girl, about ten years old, in a storage room by the kitchen, feeling invisible hands holding their hands under the ice when they filled ice buckets, and objects moving. Two séances have been held here, which were televised, during which contact was made with Captain John Stone, a female innkeeper, and a small girl.

St. Francisville, in Louisianna: It is said that the Myrtles Plantation, built in 1796, which is today a bed-and-breakfast, is home to several spirits and ghosts because of a suicide and ten murders that have taken place in it in the past. For example, the ghost of Cleo is seen, who was a slave and had been hung for killing two small girls by poisoning them, along with those girls, as well as that of William Winter, who had been a former owner and had been shot to death on the front porch. Some of the other ghosts that visitors have seen is that of one who meets visitors at the gate, telling them that the plantation has been closed, as well as ghosts in the slave graveyard, which is located on the property.

Midlothian, in Illinois: The Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery located here belongs to the 1800s, and since 1965 has been practically abandoned, having been vandalized since then. It is said that occultist and satanic groups perform their rituals amongst the ruined tombstones, and there have been more than hundred reports of unexplained phenomena taking place here. For example, inexplicable voices and lights, strange creatures being sighted, strange photographs, and so on.

Skagway, in Alaska: It is said that two ghosts haunt the old Golden North Hotel located here. One of them has been nicknamed ‘Mary’ by the staff, who think she is the ghost of a young woman who had died in her room due to pneumonia, while she waited for the return of her fiancé, who had gone on an expedition for prospecting gold. It is said her presence is still seen in Room 23, where her apparition has appeared and guests have said that they have felt being choked in the night. The other ghost appears as an eerie light moving around at night in Room 14.

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