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OAK ALLEY PLANTATION

OAK ALLEY PLANTATION PAINTING BY RICARDO PUSTANIO ©2006

Oak Alley Plantation, Restaurant & Inn
3645 Highway 18 (Great River Road) Vacherie, Louisiana USA 70090
Phone: (225) 265-2151 or 1-800-44ALLEY Fax: (225) 265-7035
E-mail: ContactUs@OakAlleyPlantation.com

www.oakalleyplantation.com

 

 

“Old buildings appear to be particularly attractive to ghosts. These last are often alleged to be souls of former residents, whose earthly mission was tragically cut short, leaving a frustrated spirit grasping at bizarre means to capture the attention and support of the living in order to resolve personal unfinished business. Of course, the older the building, the longer the list of resident souls and the greater the possibility of drama. No antebellum plantation home is without at least one ghost, running the gamut from wispy shadows to an assortment of aggressive, howling poltergeists.
Oak Alley is no exception.”
-- Joanne Amort,

 

OAK ALLEY OAK TREE



We came to Oak Alley Plantation, with its “avenue” of live oaks so famous that it is easily recognizable as the quintessential image of the Southern plantation home, on a humid day in mid-September to discover the truth behind the stories of hauntings and, maybe, the identity of the famous Black Lady of Oak Alley.

 

OAK ALLEY PLANTATION VIEW



The first thing any visitor to Oak Alley wants to do upon arrival near the gates of the plantation is to pull aside off the great River Road and trudge up the grassy river levee to take in the full view of this majestic jewel of the old sugar country. With the river at your back you stand enthralled by the majesty of the Avenue of Oaks that stand between the plantation big house and the mighty Mississippi River. And as the literature and the tour guides at Oak Alley will tell you, “In the beginning there were the trees!” This is a favorite spot for perfect photos of Oak Alley plantation framed between the ancient trees that have made it famous all over the world.

A Brief History of Oak Alley Plantation

“The story of Oak Alley begins with the trees. Early records suggest that sometime in the early 1700’s a settler built a small house on the site of the present mansion. It was he who planted the twenty-eight live oak trees in two well-spaced rows, stretching from his home to the Mississippi River. The present day mansion was built in 1837-1839 by a wealthy Creole sugar planter, Jacques Telesphore Roman. Although spared during the Civil War, post war difficulties forced the sale of Oak Alley at auction in 1866 for $32,800. A succession of owners followed until 1925 when Andrew and Josephine Stewart purchased the stately old River Road plantation and converted her into [one of] the finest remaining examples of adaptive restoration. Their efforts also initiated the move toward restoring many of the area’s historic buildings. After serving once again as a comfortable and happy home, Oak Alley was left by Josephine Stewart as a non-profit foundation so that others might continue to enjoy her beauty and dream of her rich past. Oak Alley remains today as an enduring monument to the grandeur of the golden age of Louisiana Creole Society.

 

HAUNTED OAK ALLEY PLANTATION



Nowhere in the Mississippi Valley is there a more spectacular setting. Picture wide galleries and cool halls, mellowed by the winds of time. Picture a quarter-mile alley of sheltering live oak trees nearly three hundred years old. Better yet, picture yourself enjoying the beautiful National Historic Landmark in the opulence and splendor of the 1840’s and 50’s along the Great River Road, when sugar was king.” -- Joanne Amort, Oak Alley Plantation

Having arrived between tour times (there are tours conducted on every hour while the house is open), we decided to stroll the grounds and then take in lunch at the beautiful Oak Alley Plantation Restaurant specializing in Cajun and Creole dishes.



OAK ALLEY PLANTATION RESTAURANT

If you are planning a ghost hunting adventure or pleasure trip to Oak Alley, don’t miss the opportunity to dine in this beautiful little cottage restaurant located right on the grounds.

There is a choice selection of familiar favorites such as Red Beans and Rice, Jambalaya, Chicken and Andouille Sausage Gumbo and Po-Boys, each full of the historic flavor of the Louisiana river region. This day we dined on the gumbo and a delicious Chicken Fricassee of stewed chicken with mushrooms in a homemade brown gravy. After the excellent meal, we decided to have dessert and have to say, if there is ONE single menu item you order at the Oak Alley restaurant, DO NOT miss the Bread Pudding and Whiskey Sauce! We laughingly decided that if there were indeed ghosts at Oak Alley, very likely they were hanging around for the fantastic food!

 


fFIE OR CASUAL THE FOODS GREAT!




“At this point it seems appropriate to explain that the name CREOLE is a derivative of the Spanish ‘Criollo,’ meaning ‘native born,’ and was used to denote children of European parentage born in the New World. French Creoles, such as the Romans [the owners of Oak Alley at the height of its history], viewed their new countrymen with disdain, claiming they had no refinement at all, and withdrew into the Vieux Carre (or Old Square) [French Quarter] where the French language and old ways prevailed.” -- Joanne Amort, Oak Alley Plantation.

At four o’clock on the dot we met our tour guide, a warm, friendly Cajun woman named Gilda, in the grand foyer of the beautiful old home. With some introduction and guidelines out of the way (for instance, no photography is allowed inside the home), Gilda escorted us through the beautiful home and into another age.


GLDA OAK ALLEY TOUR GUIDE OF THE VERY HAUNTED PLANTATION.



Oak Alley has a long and interesting history that was wrought right along with the fortunes of the sugar cane trade. The land and house passed through the hands of several families but when it came into the possession of Jacques T. Roman and his beautiful young wife, Celina Pilie Roman.

As our guide Gilda describes, it was for Celina that Jacques labored so hard to make Oak Alley into a palatial manor suitable for the wife of the man known far and wide as “the Sugar King of Louisiana.”

Oak Alley – it received it’s name from the riverboat captains who viewed the great house from their river passages – was a labor of love throughout: It is believed that Celina’s father, Gilbert Pilie, was actually the architect who designed the home; in its construction, no expense was spared. As Gilda so aptly points out, the treasures preserved inside the home today are a bare sampling of the wealth that flowed throughout the house at the height of the Roman fortunes. Every conceivable convenience – including 113 slaves – was enjoyed by the Romans in their heyday.

Unfortunately, as happened to many of the landed families along the river, the tide of the Roman fortunes eventually turned. Celina’s unchecked spending, the loss of several children in infancy, Jacques’ declining health and ultimate death, and the outbreak of the Civil War all intruded upon the fantasy-like existence of those at Oak Alley. This was the beginning of a period of long decline in the plantation’s fortunes, and, oddly enough, as Gilda related these sad events in detail, the atmosphere throughout the house became heavy, the mood entirely changed; a shadow seemed to pass over us all.


DARKNESS FALLS

There is always a darker side to the story of each plantation and Gilda touched on this regularly throughout our tour. It is obvious that there is more to Oak Alley than meets the naked eye.

It quickly became obvious to us that there were unseen members in our tour group from the start. At the outset, when Gilda first mentioned the change in fortunes of the Roman family and their ultimate loss of the plantation, we noticed the lights in the foyer area flicker. Again, in the dining room, when Gilda described the mourning room located on the upper floor and the infant crib (the only original furnishing in the home to have been used by Jacques and Celina Roman) where several of the family babies had died, the lights dimmed noticeably.

 

OAK ALLEY PLANTATION, EVERY VIEW IS PICTURE PERFECT.



Jacques Roman died at the age of 48 leaving young Celina a melancholy and repentant widow. It is said that Celina had no idea how ill her husband had been before his death and this fact, combined with the realization that without him she would lose her beloved home, made her inconsolable. For the next eleven years, all that remained of her life, she wore black in memory of Jacques and wandered the halls in perpetual grief, sighing and often weeping softly. When she died, she was laid out in the mourning room, which stands to the left at the top of the main staircase; the room is preserved with examples of Victorian-era mourning practices, including black netting draped over the room’s large mirror. Examples of Victorian mourning wear lie over the room’s fainting couch and also adorn a mannequin in this room; the room also contains the dreaded infant crib.

At this point Gilda directly addressed the hauntings associated with Oak Alley, most especially that of the ghostly Black Lady. She stated that, although there are several popular theories concerning who exactly the Black Lady might be, she and the entire plantation staff feel strongly that this is the ghost of the widowed Celina. She also stated that another “definite” presence in the house was that of the last owner, Mrs. Josephine Stewart, who, with her husband Andrew, purchased the long-abandoned plantation home in 1925 and lovingly restored Oak Alley to a model of its former beauty.

Both women, said Gilda, had died in the house and had been laid out on the second floor: Celina Roman in the Victorian mourning room and Josephine Stewart in her favorite Lavender Room nearby.

Saying that Mrs. Stewart’s presence had a definite “comforting” feel, Gilda added, “there are several ghosts associated with this house, just as there are with many other plantation homes – there are at least two other female ghosts in the house besides Mrs. Stewart – and there has been a lot of speculation about who these others are. But we [the staff] really feel strongly that the Black Lady is the ghost of Celina Roman because there is such a sadness associated with her appearances.”

As Gilda opened the great veranda doors and directed the group outside to enjoy and photograph the view, we took her aside and asked her directly about the legend of the Black Lady, specifically that it is often publicized that the ghost is that of a daughter or family member of a later owner of the home, Antoine Sobral.

“There is that story,” Gilda told us, “of the daughter who fell down the stairs to get away from an aggressive suitor. She did injure her leg and her leg was amputated when it went gangrene. But she went to New Orleans, became a nun and spent her life there. When she died, she was originally buried in New Orleans but her body was moved to the graveyard here.

“But as far as the Black Lady is concerned,” Gilda went on, “we fell, I mean the tour guides all feel, that this is Celina. She wandered the halls for years after Jacques died and her life ended in such sadness, we don’t doubt it’s her.”

At this very moment, with no one else nearby in the upper foyer, the lights above us dimmed and almost went out. When we pointed this out to Gilda she smiled and said, “Oh, that happens all the time, especially when we talk about the babies and Jacques’ death.”

Just at this moment, the plantation’s yellow cat ran by and out on the veranda, giving us a little shock. Gilda laughed and said, “No, that was a real cat! But I’ll tell you this: when I first came here I didn’t believe all that business about ghosts and everything. I thought it was just stories they made up. But one afternoon I was in the downstairs hall, waiting for the tour to get together, and it was a little cool outside, so I had put a shawl over my shoulders. And as I was standing in the downstairs foyer, right in front of me, from my left, I saw a dog run out of the dining room and pass behind me – it even moved my skirt when it passed! I spun around and that’s when I realized that where the dog had run to was the wall and the closed door. I mean, no dog could have gotten out of the foyer and not run past me again!

 



“When I told the other guides about this, they laughed and said that I had finally met the ‘family pet’,” Gilda laughed, “and I’ll tell you I’ve seen it several times since then!”

Gilda also happily shared an experience she had had just a week before. “Well, it gets spooky around here at closing time, I can tell you that, and I was shutting up last Saturday in a hurry trying to get to church. One other guide was here with me and I went around locking up and turning off lights, and when I got downstairs she called to me from the alarm box that the motion detector was going off upstairs. So,” she hesitated with relish, “I went upstairs and checked every room, even up to the attic floor and there was no one around. I came down and went to the front door and the other lady called out again!” Gilda laughed. “I guess I was anxious to get on to church or something, but finally I just shouted out, ‘I really need to shut up early tonight! I have to get to church! Will you please let me lock up?’ Well, don’t you know that the other guide stuck her head out and looked at me and said, ‘It stopped as soon as you said you had to get to church!’”

We laughed with her, and Gilda seems to take it all in stride, but, she added, “I will say this, I get a little scared myself whenever I do a tour in French.” (Gilda is a native Cajun and speaks perfect French; as such she is always asked to accompany French-speaking tourists. She went on, “Because you know, French is all the Roman family spoke. Whenever I do a tour in French, or translate for French visitors, I get the feeling more than other times that I’m being watched, like Celina is right nearby listening.

Almost as if on cue – and one might say it was on cue if there had been a whole group nearby, but it was just Gilda and the two of us – the lights above us dimmed again. Gilda looked at us knowingly.


GO AND SEE OAK ALLEY

For the sheer beauty of the home and surroundings, and the delicious restaurant fare, a visit to Oak Alley would be a delight. But for the ghost hunter or fan of the paranormal, the unexpected appearances of the home’s ghostly residents – which we are told intensify as night descends on the old house – Oak Alley is a don’t miss stop on any tour of the Great River Road plantations.

Oak Alley also offers accommodations for overnight stays in little bungalows set back from the home on the edge of the picturesque sugar cane fields.

But be warned: the dappled beauty and rich delights of the daylight hours easily begin to take on a gloomy aspect as the sun descends. Night at Oak Alley is probably very dark – and very busy – indeed!

 

THEY DON'T CALL IT OAK ALLEY FOR NOTHING.



RATING: THREE AND A HALF SKULLS

OAK ALLEY PLANTATION PAINTING BY RICARDO PUSTANIO ©2006

Oak Alley Plantation, Restaurant & Inn
3645 Highway 18 (Great River Road) Vacherie, Louisiana USA 70090
Phone: (225) 265-2151 or 1-800-44ALLEY Fax: (225) 265-7035
E-mail: ContactUs@OakAlleyPlantation.com

OAK ALLEY PLANTATION

http://www.oakalleyplantation.com/

 

>PLEASE READ ALL ABOUT THE OAK ALLEY HAUNTINGS HERE NOW! <

OAK ALLEY PLANTATION ONE OF THE SOUTHS MOST HAUNTED PLANTATIONS WALLPAPER BY RICARDO PUSTANIO FROM HAUNTED AMERICA TOURS

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Oak Alley , Sloss Furnace, Amityville, Spittalfields, London East End, London, England, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp, Oswiecim, Poland, Amityville, NY, or the Waverly Ghosts of the Kentucky Sanatorium, Bachelor's Grove, Bald Mountain Or The entire Haunted City of New Orleans. It's all up to conjecture... Haunted America Tours lets People who visit the site vote to see what they believe is the most haunted location, other paranormal sites, and television shows pick and choose their haunted places for you.

THIS STORY MAY JUST PUT A NEW REAL HAUNTED HOTSPOT ON YOUR LIST OF REAL SCARY AND MOST HAUNTED PLACES TO INVESTIGATE!

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Plantation Homes Near New Orleans


Madewood Plantation
Madewood Plantation, one of Louisiana's majestic antebellum plantations, operates a Bed and Breakfast, allowing visitors to sleep in the plantation home on genuine antiques. Open for tours daily:

10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.(last tour).
For information, please call 1-800-375-7151, daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., or write to us at 4250 Hwy. 308, Napoleonville, LA 70390.
Our fax # is 985-369-9848. Official Web Site www.madewood.com

Oak Alley Plantation
Truly the quintessential Greek Revival Antebellum Plantation, it is one of the most visited of the plantations and antebellum homes along the river. Oak Alley Plantation, Restaurant & Inn
3645 Highway 18 (Great River Road) •- Vacherie, Louisiana USA 70090
Phone: (225) 265-2151 or 1-800-44ALLEY •Fax: (225) 265-7035
E-mail: ContactUs@OakAlleyPlantation.com

Official Web Site www.oakalleyplantation.com

Nottoway Plantation Home
Nottoway Plantation is a great bed & breakfast, and its grand white ballroom is a favorite for weddings. At the edge of sugar cane fields, Nottoway stands overlooking the Mississippi River. This enormous mansion, completed in 1859, reflects an unusual combination. Greek revival architectural elements blend with innovations that were the fanciful desires of the original owner. Not only is the floor plan irregular, but the house contained many elements that were innovative and rare in the mid-19th century, such as indoor plumbing and hot and cold running water.


Today Nottoway is open daily to the public.
Take a guided tour, stay overnight, have dinner,
perhaps even get married in this magnificent plantation!

Official Web Site www.nottoway.com

Beauregard House at Chalmette Battlefield
Site of the Battle of New Orleans in 1814–1815, (the last battle of the War of 1812), the Civil War Chalmette National Cemetery, and Beauregard House.

Also located on the Chalmette Battlefield grounds, and serving as a museum and visitor center, is the Beauregard House. Beauregard House was never used as a plantation, and was built in 1830. It is named for René Beauregard, its last owner, the son of the Civil War Confederate General, P. G. T. Beauregard (whose monument is at the entrance to City Park, at the north end of Esplanade Avenue). While many visitors arrive by automobile, many also arrive by riverboat, the Chalmette Battlefield being part of the tour.

Destrehan Plantation

Destrehan Plantation was built in 1787, originally of West Indies architecture, but later renovated to the then popular Greek Revival Style. It is the oldest documented plantation house left intact in the lower Mississippi Valley.

The plantation bears the name of its builder, Jean Noel Destrehan, who acquired the estate from his father-in-law, Robin de Longy. It was here that the process of producing granulated sugar was perfected, and helped to establish sugar cane as the major crop of the area, replacing indigo. After years of neglect, restoration is now continuing. Today, the house is open for guided tours, and is available for dinner parties, wedding receptions and special events.

Destrehan Plantation
13034 River Road
Destrehan, Louisiana 70047

Phone: (985) 764-9315 (Local from New Orleans)
Fax: (985) 725-1929 E-mail: DestPlan@aol.com


Ormond Plantations
Two historic Antebellum Plantation Homes within 30 minutes of New Orleans are Destrehan and Ormond Plantations.

Claiming to be the oldest French West Indies style plantation in the lower Mississippi valley, Ormond was also built in the late 1700's. Like most of the early plantations of the area, it began as a farm for indigo, but later switched to the more profitable sugar cane crop.


Originally acquired as a French land grant, the plantation stretched from the Mississippi River to Lake Pontchartrain. During its long history, it was the focal point for parties and celebrations, a prize to be captured during the Civil War, makeshift housing for troops heading to the Battle of New Orleans, and more.

Today the estate is but a mere 16 acres, but is restored, as closely as possible, to the way it was during its prime. It is privately owned, and the owner lives in the house. Several rooms are available to guests as a Bed and Breakfast, allowing visitors to savor the atmosphere of the 19th century, with a view of the mighty Mississippi River from the upper gallery. It is becoming quite a popular place to have weddings and honeymoons. For added intrigue, Ormond, also, has its own ghost story. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Circa 1787
13786 River Road, Destrehan, Louisiana 70047
Phone 985-764-8544 | Fax 985-764-0691 or info@plantation.com

www.plantation.com

Laura Plantation Home
Laura, a French Creole Plantation Home, claims to be the American Home of Br'er Rabbit. Despite a devastating fire on August 9, 2004, Laura Plantation has continued to offer visitors
what Lonely Planet calls "The Best History Tour in the U.S."
The morning following the fire, guests continued to come. And they still do.

Laura Plantation
2247 Hwy 18
Vacherie, LA 70090

tel: 225 265 7690 / fax: 225 265 7960
info@lauraplantation.com

 

/www.lauraplantation.com

La Branche Plantation Dependency House
La Branche Plantation Dependency House on the River Road in St. Rose, LA is what we call a Garconniere.

La Branche Plantation Dependency House, on the River Road in St. Rose, LA, is an interesting stop on the Southeastern Louisiana Plantation tour, because it is a visit to a plantation home that no longer exists. All that remains is the Dependency House, which had a function that is pretty much what the name implies. It is what we usually call a Garconniere (French for bachelor quarters). La Branche is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Zweig family, of Germany, built the plantation in 1792. Because of neglect, the effects of the Civil War, the economics during and after Reconstruction, and the division of the property among heirs, there is little left to indicate what was once there, save for "an alley" of Oaks. The site of the main house is on private land, and is not accessible to anyone, without the permission of the owners. The Dependency House is on land currently owned by the Lentini family, and is open to the public. Included in the inventory is the actual bathtub of Zachery Taylor.

www.labrancheplantation.com

Houmas House Plantation
One of the most visited Antebellum Plantation Homes near New Orleans. It was used as the filming location for the film "Hush, Hush, Sweet Charolette," starring Bette Davis.

Not only do tourists come by the busloads, but locals may make the drive to spend a couple of hours on the grounds, followed by lunch in nearby restaurants, before returning home. Houmas is a home with the architectural style that most people envision when they think of the old plantations. It was used as the filming location for the film "Hush, Hush, Sweet Charolette," starring Bette Davis.

Located in the small river community of Darrow, LA, it sits on a few acres on the Mississippi River, much smaller than the 20,000 acres that it once had. The present Houmas House was built in 1840 by Col. John Smith Preston, on land originally owned by the Houmas Indians, hence the name.

www.houmashouse.com

 

 

 

 

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