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The Loch Ness Monster

Loch Ness Monster

WARNING: This part of our Haunted Museum deals with strange News stories. The reported discovery creatures, Cryptids and just weird nature. Some of the photos are art may be disturbing to some so please be ready to close down the actual page if you wish or click on the Panic button provided to take you elsewhere on the Internet or another page in this site so you may regain your composure. The things you see here are reported as real. This part of the Haunted Museum is not for the Squeamish by any means!

 

The Loch Ness Monster is a cryptid, claimed to inhabit Scotland's Loch Ness, the most voluminous freshwater lake in Great Britain. The creature's "scientific" name, chosen by the late Sir Peter Scott in Nature, is Nessiteras rhombopteryx (Greek for "the wonder of Ness with the diamond shaped fin").

The earliest known report occurred in the Life of St. Columba by Adamnan, written around the 7th century. It describes how in 565 Columba saved the life of a Pict, who was being supposedly attacked by the monster. Adamnan describes the event as follows:

"...(He) raised his holy hand, while all the rest, brethren as well as strangers, were stupefied with terror, and, invoking the name of God, formed the saving sign of the cross in the air, and commanded the ferocious monster, saying, "Thou shalt go no further, nor touch the man; go back with all speed." Then at the voice of the saint, the monster was terrified, and fled more quickly than if it had been pulled back with ropes, though it had just got so near to Lugne, as he swam, that there was not more than the length of a spear-staff between the man and the beast. Then the brethren seeing that the monster had gone back, and that their comrade Lugne returned to them in the boat safe and sound, were struck with admiration, and gave glory to God in the blessed man. And even the barbarous heathens, who were present, were forced by the greatness of this miracle, which they had seen, to magnify the God of the Christians"

Sceptics question the reliability of the Life of St. Columba as evidence for the Loch Ness Monster's existence, noting that the book describes implausible events, such as an incident when Columba slays a wild boar by the power of his voice alone. They argue that the monster encounter is said to have occurred on the River Ness, not in the Loch, and that Adamnan reports Columba encountering and conquering assorted "monsters" at various locations in Scotland, throughout his life. Moreover, sceptics assert that there are no other accounts of the Loch Ness monster attacking anyone, as the creature is normally portrayed as shy. In fact, biographies of the early saints were often embellished or invented for purposes of religious persuasion rather than historical record.

The 'Surgeon's Photo'

One of the most iconic images of Nessie is known as the 'Surgeon's Photograph' which many consider to be good evidence of the monster, although doubts about the photograph's authenticity were expressed from the beginning. The image was revealed as a hoax in the 1990s. The photographer, a gynecologist named Robert Kenneth Wilson, never claimed it to be a picture of the monster. He merely claimed to have photographed "something in the water". The photo is often cropped to make the monster seem huge, while the original uncropped shot shows the other end of the loch and the monster in the centre. The ripples on the photo fit the size and circular pattern of small ripples as opposed to large waves when photographed up close. Skeptics in the 1980s argued the photo was that of an otter or a diving bird, but after Christian Spurling's confession agree it was what Spurling claimed - a toy submarine with a sculpted head attached.

The Legend of Nessie, the Ultimate Loch Ness Monster Site
The Legend of Nessie the Ultimate and Official Loch Ness Monster Site, with up-to-date information and photographs of new and past sightings.

www.nessie.co.uk/


Analyses of the original uncropped image have fostered further doubt. Just a year before the hoax was revealed, the makers of Discovery Communications's documentary Loch Ness Discovered did an analysis of the uncropped image and found a white object evident in every version of the photo, implying that it was on the negative. "It seems to be the source of ripples in the water, almost as if the object was towed by something.", the narrator said. "But science cannot rule out it was just a blemish on the negative," he continued. Additionally, analysis of the full photograph revealed the object to be quite small, only about two to three feet long.

Spurling was the son-in-law of Marmaduke Wetherell, a big game hunter who was deceived into searching for the storied Loch Ness monster based on evidence which turned out to be a children's prank. Wetherell was publicly ridiculed in the Daily Mail, the journal which employed him. Spurling claimed that to get revenge, Marmaduke Wetherell committed the hoax, with the help of Chris Spurling (a sculpture specialist), his son Ian Marmaduke, who bought the material for the fake Nessie, and Maurice Chambers (an insurance agent), who would call to ask surgeon Robert Kenneth Wilson to display the pictures. Some doubt Spurling's confession because of the involvement of several people not connected to Wilson.

LOUIS MOE: Soir d'ete


The Taylor film (1938)
In 1938 Mr GE Taylor, a South African tourist, filmed something in the loch for three minutes on 16mm colour film, which is now in the possession of Dr. Maurice Burton. However, Dr. Burton has refused to show the film to Loch Ness investigators (such as Peter Costello or the Loch Ness Investigation Bureau). A single frame was published in his book The Elusive Monster; before he retired. Dr. Roy P Mackal, a respected biologist and cryptozoologist, declared the frame to be "positive evidence."


The Dinsdale film (1960)
In 1960, aeronautical engineer Tim Dinsdale filmed a hump crossing the water in a powerful wake unlike that of a boat. JARIC declared that the object was "probably animate".[2] Others were sceptical, saying that the "hump" cannot be ruled out as being a boat and claimed that when the contrast is turned up too high a man can be clearly seen in a boat. Some have questioned this, because the version they were watching was a pirate copy.[citation needed] This copy may itself have been a fake attempt to imitate the original.[citation needed]

In 1993 Discovery Communications made a documentary called Loch Ness Discovered that featured a digital enhancement of the Dinsdale film. A computer expert who enhanced the film noticed a shadow in the negative which was not very obvious in the positive. By enhancing and overlaying frames, he found what appeared to be the rear body, the rear flippers, and 1-2 additional humps of a plesiosaur-like body. He said that: "Before I saw the film, I thought the Loch Ness Monster was a load of rubbish. Having done the enhancement, I'm not so sure". [24] Some have countered this finding by saying that the angle of the film from the horizontal along with sun's angle on that day made shadows underwater unlikely . Believers (and some nonbelievers) claim the shape could have been undisturbed water that was only coincidentally shaped like a plesiosaur's rear end. But the same source also says that there might be a smaller object (hump or head) in front of the hump causing this. Nonetheless, the enhancement did show a smaller second hump and possibly a third hump.


The Holmes video (2007)
On May 26, 2007, Gordon Holmes, a 55-year-old lab technician, captured video of what he said was "this jet black thing, about 45 feet long, moving fairly fast in the water." Adrian Shine, a marine biologist at the Loch Ness 2000 center in Drumnadrochit, has watched the video and plans to analyze it. It is said to be "among the finest footage ever taken". BBC Scotland broadcast the video on May 29, 2007.

 

Man says he captured Loch Ness on film

 

Along with Sasquatch (Bigfoot) and the El Chupacabra, the Loch Ness Monster is one the best most well known moster mysteries of cryptozoology. Most scientists and other experts find current evidence supporting the creature's existence unpersuasive, and regard the occasional sightings as hoaxes or misidentification of known creatures or natural phenomena. Belief in the legend persists around the world, however. Local people, and later many around the world, have affectionately referred to the animal by the epithet of Nessie.

There are many speculations as to what the reported lake monsters could be. Many consider them to be purely exaggerations or misinterpretations of known and natural phenomena, or else fabrications and hoaxes. Misidentified sightings of seals, otters, deer, diving water birds, large fish such as giant sturgeons, logs, mirages, seiches, light distortion, crossing boat wakes, or unusual wave patterns have all been proposed to explain specific reports. Skeptics point out that descriptions of these creatures vary over time with the values and mood of the local cultures, following the pattern of folk beliefs and not what would be expected if the reports were of actual encounters with real animals.

This underwater photo, taken in 1972 during the Rines expedition,it aledges to show a plesiosaur-like creature.

The most common eyewitness description of Nessie, is that of a plesiosaur, a long-necked aquatic reptile that became extinct during the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event. Supporters of the plesiosaur theory cite the survival of a fish called the coelacanth, which supposedly went extinct along with the plesiosaur but was rediscovered off the coast of Madagascar in 1938.

On the other hand, mainstream science does offer plausible reasons why such an animal could not exist in Loch Ness. Apart from its apparent extinction, the plesiosaur was probably a cold-blooded reptile requiring warm tropical waters, while the average temperature of Loch Ness is only about 5.5°C (42°F). Even if the plesiosaurs were warm-blooded, they would require a food supply beyond that of Loch Ness to maintain the level of activity necessary for warm-blooded animals.

According to the Swedish naturalist and author Bengt Sjögren (1980), present day beliefs in loch monsterss such as "Nessie" are associated with the old legends of kelpies. He claims that the accounts of loch monsters have changed over the ages, originally describing a horse appearance, they claimed that the "kelpie" would come out of the lake and turn into a horse. When a tired traveller would get on the back of the kelpie, it would gallop into the loch and devour its prey. This myth successfully kept children away from the loch, as was its purpose. Sjögren concludes that the kelpie legends have developed into more plausible descriptions of lake monsters, reflecting awareness of plesiosaurs. In other words, the kelpie of folklore has been transformed into a more "realistic" and "contemporary" notion of the creature. Believers counter that long-dead witnesses could only compare the creature to that which they were familiar -- and were not familiar with plesiosaurs.

Rumours of a huge animal living in the loch have existed for centuries. Some believers have argued that a lengthy history of monster sightings in the loch provides ample circumstantial evidence of the creature's existence. Others question the accuracy of such tales, and argue that they were generally unknown before the early 1960s when a strong wave of interest focused on the first clear examples of Nessie sightings in the 1930s.[citation needed] For example, an alleged sighting in October 1871 by a "D. Mackenzie", who supposedly described seeing something that moved slowly before moving off at a faster speed, has been repeated in several places, no original 1871 source for this report has been discovered, indicating that it may be an invention.

There have been far too many sightings to list in a single article. Many were questionable because of distance or other poor conditions; some sightings are cases of misidentified deer or boat wakes, and of course, there have been several hoaxes. There are some sightings, however, which cannot be easily explained.

Creationists argue the carcass is a plesiosaur.


Saint Columba (565)
The earliest known report occurred in the Life of St. Columba by Adamnan, written around the 7th century. It describes how in 565 Columba saved the life of a Pict, who was being supposedly attacked by the monster. Adamnan describes the event as follows:

"...(He) raised his holy hand, while all the rest, brethren as well as strangers, were stupefied with terror, and, invoking the name of God, formed the saving sign of the cross in the air, and commanded the ferocious monster, saying, "Thou shalt go no further, nor touch the man; go back with all speed." Then at the voice of the saint, the monster was terrified, and fled more quickly than if it had been pulled back with ropes, though it had just got so near to Lugne, as he swam, that there was not more than the length of a spear-staff between the man and the beast. Then the brethren seeing that the monster had gone back, and that their comrade Lugne returned to them in the boat safe and sound, were struck with admiration, and gave glory to God in the blessed man. And even the barbarous heathens, who were present, were forced by the greatness of this miracle, which they had seen, to magnify the God of the Christians".[28]

Sceptics question the reliability of the Life of St. Columba as evidence for the Loch Ness Monster's existence, noting that the book describes implausible events, such as an incident when Columba slays a wild boar by the power of his voice alone. They argue that the monster encounter is said to have occurred on the River Ness, not in the Loch, and that Adamnan reports Columba encountering and conquering assorted "monsters" at various locations in Scotland, throughout his life. Moreover, sceptics assert that there are no other accounts of the Loch Ness monster attacking anyone, as the creature is normally portrayed as shy. In fact, biographies of the early saints were often embellished or invented for purposes of religious persuasion rather than historical record.


Land sightings
Although sightings of the creature on land around the loch reputedly date back to the sixteenth century, modern interest in the monster was sparked by a 22 July 1933 sighting, when Mr George Spicer and his wife saw 'a most extraordinary form of animal' cross the road in front of their car. They described the creature as having a large body (about 4 feet high and 25 feet long), and long, narrow neck, slightly thicker than an elephant's trunk and as long as the 10-12 foot width of the road; the neck had a number of undulations in it. They saw no limbs because of a dip in the road obscuring the animal's lower portion. It lurched across the road towards the loch some 20 yards away, leaving only a trail of broken undergrowth in its wake.

On 5 January 1934 a motorcyclist called Arthur Grant claimed to have nearly hit the creature while approaching Abriachan on the northeastern shore, at about 1 am on a moonlit night. Grant saw a small head attached to a long neck; the creature saw him and crossed the road back into the loch. Grant dismounted and followed it to the loch, but only saw ripples where it had entered.

In another 1934 sighting, a young maidservant named Margaret Munro supposedly observed the creature for about 20 minutes. It was about 6:30 am on 5 June, when she spotted it on shore from about 200 yards. She described it as having elephant-like skin, a long neck, a small head and two short forelegs or flippers. The sighting ended when the creature reentered the water.

Sporadic land sightings continued until 1963, when a poor-quality film of the creature was made from a distance of several miles


Sightings in the loch
In May 1943, CB Farrel of the Royal Observer Corps was supposedly distracted from his duties by a Nessie sighting. He was about 250 yards away from a large-eyed, 'finned' creature, which had a 20-30 foot long body, and a neck that protruded about 4-5 feet out of the water

In December 1954 a strange sonar contact was made by the fishing boat Rival III. The vessel's crew observed sonar readings of a large object keeping pace with the boat at a depth of 480 feet. It was detected travelling for half a mile in this manner, before contact was lost.

Lake monster locations and names

Argentina
Lago Nahuel Huapi

Canada
Lake Manitoba (Manitoba)
Lake Simcoe (Ontario - Kempenfelt Kelly)
Okanagan Lake (British Columbia - Ogopogo)
Lake Memphrémagog (Quebec, partly in USA)

Chile
Lago Las Rocas

China
Crescent Lake
Lake Kenas/Lake Kanas (Xinjiang/Uighurstan)
Lake Menbu
Lake Tianchi (partly in North Korea)

Iceland
Kleifarvatn

Ireland
Lough Keane
Lough Ree
Lough Muck

Italy
Lake Garda
Lake Maggiore (partly in Switzerland)

Japan
Lake Ikeda
Lake Kussharo

 

Kazakhstan
Ozero Koskol'

Malaysia
Tasik Chini

Norway
Mjøsa
Seljordsvatnet

Russia
Lake Baikal (Siberia)
Lake Brosno
Lake Khaiyr

Sweden
Torne träsk in Norrbotten
Malgomaj in Västerbotten
Tavelsjön in Västerbotten
Råsvalen in Västmanland
Åmänningen in Västmanland
Storsjön in Jämtland - Storsjöodjuret
Kallsjön in Jämtland
Norra Dellen in Hälsingland
Södra Dellen in Hälsingland
Gryttjen in Hälsingland - Gryttie
Judarn in Stockholm
Svarttjärn in Stockholm
Vättern in Östergötland
Salstern in Östergötland
Regnaren in Östergötland
Stensjön in Östergötland
Lickasjön in Östergötland
Svartsjön in Östergötland
Stora resjön in Östergötland
Västjutten in Östergötland
Åmmelången in Närke
Fegen in Småland
Sommen in Småland
Tingstäde träsk in Gotland
Mjörn in Västergötland
Bullaren in Bohuslän

Swedish lakes rumoured to have lake monsters
Torne träsk in Norrbotten
Malgomaj in Västerbotten
Tavelsjön in Västerbotten
Råsvalen in Västmanland
Åmänningen in Västmanland
Storsjön in Jämtland - Nickname: "Storsjöodjuret"
Kallsjön in Jämtland
Norra Dellen in Hälsingland
Södra Dellen in Hälsingland
Gryttjen in Hälsingland - Nickname: "Gryttie"
Judarn in Stockholm
Svarttjärn in Stockholm
Vättern in Östergötland
Salstern in Östergötland
Regnaren in Östergötland
Stensjön in Östergötland
Lickasjön in Östergötland
Svartsjön in Östergötland
Stora resjön in Östergötland
Västjutten in Östergötland
Åmmelången in Närke
Fegen in Småland
Sommen in Småland
Tingstäde träsk in Gotland
Mjörn in Västergötland
Bullaren in Bohuslän
Varberg Fortress Moat Monster
Rönningesjön in Täby - Nickname: "Storbjäfsen"

Turkey
Lake Van

United Kingdom

Loch Ness Monster taken from Urquhart Castle on May 21, 1977. (FORTEAN PICTURE LIBRARY)

Bala Lake (Wales)
Bassenthwaite Lake (England) - Eachy
Windermere (England) - Eachy

Morag or Mòrag (Scottish Gaelic) is a loch monster reported to live in Loch Morar, Scotland. After Nessie herself, it is among the best known of Scotland's legendary monsters.

The name "Morag" is a pun on the name of the lake in which the creatures lives, and of the Scottish female name, "Morag". Sightings date back to 1887, and include some thirty four incidents, as of 1981. Sixteen of these involved multiple witnesses.

The best known encounter, in 1969, featured two men, Duncan McDonnel and William Simpson, and their speedboat, with which they accidentally struck the creature, prompting it to hit back. McDonnel retaliated with an oar, and Simpson opened fire with his rifle, whereupon it sank slowly out of sight. they described it as being brown, 25-30 feet long, and with rough skin. It had three humps rising 18 inches above the loch's surface, and a head a foot wide, held 18 inches out of the water.

A pair of photographs taken in 1977 by Miss M Lindsay show an object in the loch which is claimed to be Morag. The object appears to have moved several yards from one picture to the other. The first picture shows a round back, while the second picture seems to show two humps.

Physiologically, the creature is alleged to be similar to Nessie (having a relatively serpentine appearance, and frequently being depicted as a plesiosaur. However, plesiosaurs were unable to raise their necks in the manner described of Morag.

The Loch Ness Investigation Bureau expanded its search to include Loch Morar in February of 1970.

Several expeditions with the aim to prove or find the monster have been made, but no conclusive evidence for an unknown, large creature has been found.

The Muc-sheilch or Muc-sheilche (pronounced "Mook Helluch") is a loch monster reported to live in Loch Maree, and its neighboring lochs.

Mr Banks of Letterewe tried at great expense to drain Loch-na-Bèiste near Aultbea, in the 1850s, but failed. He also tried to poison it with quicklime. Loch-na-Bèiste is Scottish Gaelic for "loch of the beast", beast often being used for a loch monster in Ireland especially. Seilch would appear to be cognate with selkie; muc generally means a pig, but is also applied to whales as muc-mhara (sea pigs).

It has been suggested that it may be a large eel.

Seileag or An t-Seileag is the loch monster which is said to inhabit Loch Shiel in Scotland. The name may be a pun on Seile (Loch Shiel) and sìolag, a term for slender fish and eels in Scottish Gaelic.

List of Scottish loch-monsters is a list of freshwater lochs in Scotland alleged to have monsters.

Loch Monster's
Loch Arkaig
Loch Awe
Loch Linnhe
Loch Lochy Lizzie
Loch Lomond (Not reported in modern times)
Loch Maree Muc-sheilch
Loch Morar Mòrag
Loch Ness Nessie/Niseag
Loch Oich
Loch Quoich Lizzie
Loch Shiel Seileag


Loch Suainaval (Lewis) Searrach Uisge ("Water Colt")


American Lake Monsters

Lake monster or loch monster is the name given to large unknown animals which have purportedly been sighted in, and/or are believed to dwell in lakes or lochs, although their existence has never been confirmed scientifically. They are generally believed not to exist by conventional zoology and allied sciences, and are principally the subject of investigations by followers of cryptozoology. Sightings are often similar to some sea monsters. Evidence for such animals is almost exclusively in the form of frequently-numerous eyewitness reports. Relatively few still photographs, almost no motion picture or videotapes, and no living animals or animal remains have been produced.

Bear Lake (Idaho/Utah)
Lake Champlain (Vermont, USA/Canada) - Champ
Lake Erie (USA/Canada)- Bessie
Flathead Lake (Montana)
Fulk's Lake (Indiana) - Beast of Busco
Green Acres Lake (Clovis, New Mexico)
Raystown Lake (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania) - Raystown Ray
Seneca Lake (New York)
Lake Tahoe (California/Nevada)
Tuttle Creek Lake, Kansas
Lake Elsinore, California
Chesapeake Bay, Maryland/Virginia - Chessie

Other widely varied theories have been presented by believers, including unknown species of giant freshwater eels or surviving aquatic, prehistoric reptiles, such as plesiosaurs. One theory holds that the monsters that are sighted are the occasional full-grown form of an amphibian species that generally stays juvenile all its life like the axolotl. A few have suggested the animals actually represent some sort of psychic phenomena. Some have also suggested a Tanystropheus, although there are very few supporters for this theory. More reasonably, the first true cryptozoologist Bernard Heuvelmans held throughout his life that plesiosaur-type sighting were actually an unknown species of long-necked seal.

In many of these areas, especially around Loch Ness, Lake Champlain and the Okanagan Valley, these lake monsters have become important tourist draws.

"Champ" of Lake Champlain - Lake Champlain is a large lake that defines much of the border between the State of Vermont and the State of New York.

"Ogopogo" of Okanagan Lake - Stories of Ogopogo go back to before white men settled this section of British Columbia, Canada. The Native Americans called it "Natiaka" meaning "The Lake Monster." The current name comes form a song parody written in 1926.

"Manipogo" of Lake Manitoba - The name here is a derivative of the better known "Ogopogo." As with Ogopogo there were early Native American sightings and some reports by settlers. Then in 1962 two men in a boat got a picture. Looking like a snake in the water the picture isn't clear enough to prove the existence of the monster. The appearance does match up with other eye-witness reports of the creature: A long tubular body at least a foot in diameter.

 

 

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